Bridgewater Canal Stop Gates

The Bridgewater Canal has been closed since 2nd November 2015, just to the west of Worsley, for the installation of stop gates.

Advance warning of stoppage at Leigh
Advance warning of stoppage at Leigh

Large warning signs at each end, like this one at Leigh, handily positioned on the stop planks for a photo opportunity, tell boaters it will be closed until 29th February 2016.

Cycling along the Leigh Branches of the Bridgewater and Leeds & Liverpool Canals yesterday to check the data for my maps is up to date, I passed the work site as they were nearing completion.

New stop gates in the narrows
New stop gates in the narrows

The stop gates have been added at the Leigh End of the narrows for a former lift bridge which explains the old stonework in the photo.

Two sets of stop gates
Two sets of stop gates

Peering under the arm of the digger we can see one pair of stop gates closed and pointing towards us, with another pair behind them in the open position and pointing in the opposite direction.  With long lengths of lock free canals it’s important to be able to stem the water flow in either direction in the event of a breach.

Stop gates facing each way
Stop gates facing each way

The side on view show the gate beams at different heights so they can be opened and closed independently. These pairs of gates follow the convention of pointing away from each other. The water between them can be pumped out during tests every few years to check the gates successfully hold back the water.

Bunds at each end keep the water out
Bunds at each end keep the water out

They were clearing up the site as I passed and starting to take down the safety fencing.  They said they would breach the dams in the next day or two to check it all worked.  If they do that with the gates closed they can test for leaks into the central section which should remain dry, at least until filled by the inevitable small leaks, but that might cause another problem.

I could see no sign of any paddle gear and, having been separated for months the two ends of the canal are unlikely to be at exactly the same level.  When the leaks have filled the central section then one set of gates can be opened but any difference in water levels will still hold the second pair shut.

There could be a long wait until the levels in the two long pounds can be equalised if they test the gates this way. Removing the dams with the stop gates open, and testing by pumping might be a better solution.

Boaters who have been waiting for passage, like Tom and Jan on Waiouru, should find the canal open next week as planned.

UPDATE: New photos of the opened gates.

Bridgewater Canal Stop Gates – 2

I recently blogged about the new stop gates being installed on the Leigh Arm of the Bridgewater Canal.

Tom & Jan on Waiouru have cruised through the re-opened canal today and been kind enough let me have photos of the finished work, with permission to publish them.

New Stop Gates - © Tom Jones (Waiouru)
New Stop Gates – © Tom Jones (Waiouru)

I wonder what the mooring bollards are for.  Perhaps they will be handy for workboats when maintenance is being carried out.

The new stop gates have overlapping beams at different heights, although there is very little clearance between them.  It will take very little warping with age before they start touching each other and I wonder how long it will be before adjustments are required.

New Stop Gates - © Tom Jones (Waiouru)
New Stop Gates – © Tom Jones (Waiouru)

There are grooves for stop planks to be inserted so work can be carried out on the gates.  Hopefully that won’t be needed too often.